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The School is funded by a research grant from the University of Oviedo. Tuition fees, board and lodging costs in university halls of residence for participants will be covered by the School. Travel arrangements will have to be organized and paid individually. The school offers lectures with discussions by renowned international scholars, with prior reading assignments. The participants will be also required to present and discuss their Research project e. Participants will be granted a diploma after completing the school. Through their welfare arrangements societies aspire to improve the living standards of broad categories of their citizens, either directly by e.

Notwithstanding the good intentions that underlie the design and implementation of social policies, their intended social outcomes are rarely achieved to full effect. They may also result in unintended outcomes that might be unwanted. Therefore, one of the leading questions in comparative social policy analysis, with strong relevance for policy making, regards the issue whether the welfare efforts invested in society achieve their intended objectives, and if not, whether alternative designs would work out better or minimise unintended effects.

Moreover, policy outcomes may be different for different groups in society. Quite often this is intended, where policies are expressly targeted at specific categories of citizens only. However, there may be unintended differences in the degree to which social categories are benefiting from social arrangements.

Europe's immigration challenge : reconciling work, welfare and mobility - EconBiz

Thus, the question arises what effect do social policies have on levels of outcomes, and what is their effect on distributions of inequalities in outcomes? This summer school will allow a maximum of 25 PhD, Post-Docs and early career researcher to present their work and to discuss it with colleagues, international scholars and experienced researchers in the field. It will provide them with a high quality platform for receiving constructive comments from peers and seniors. They can be objective e. There is also no restriction on the methodologies quantitative or qualitative used to study these empirical questions.

As a part of the summer school, there will be an introduction and plenary lectures on selected issues of social policies and social outcomes delivered by senior researchers. Some of the lectures will deal with substantive issues, while others will focus on methodological and analytical aspects of cross-national and longitudinal analysis of social policy outcomes. Additionally, there will be paper sessions of 2 groups, working in parallel and each group will meet 3 times for two hours. For each PhD or post-doc paper 60 minutes will be available.

A paper is not presented by the author s , but by one of their peers. S he will start the discussion of the paper with a brief summary and comments. This is followed by a first reaction from the author s and then by group discussion where senior researchers act as co-commentator and moderator. PhD and post-doc students are charged a fee of This pays for organisational costs and facilities, a welcome reception, and a farewell diner. Hotel a list of hotels to choose from will be made available in due course and travel arrangements will have to be organised and paid individually.

Participants will be selected on the basis of the quality of the plans for their papers and their general fit to the theme. Please send your application to summerschool. All papers will be electronically pre-circulated to participants, at least three weeks in advance of the summer school. For more information, please write an email to summerschool. It is a major challenge for European labour markets to overcome the inherent tension between the increasing flexibility, dynamism, and efficiency requirements on the one hand, and the pressing need for social protection and social order on the other.

This course deals with recent labour market developments regarding flexibility and security: we will present and discuss the effects of structural changes such as flexibilization and rising inequality and relevant interventions by drawing on empirical research and policy analysis. Within the debate on flexicurity, special attention will be paid to the precarious position of youth and disadvantaged groups which, in the face of the economic crisis, are experiencing increased difficulties in obtaining and maintaining secure employment.

During this course, we would like to engage in discussions on the concept of employment security and place it alongside this traditional view of job security. Several topics will be covered, including the interplay between flexibility and security, European best-practices and policy lessons related to various labour market transitions unemployment-work; work-work; education-work , and the response of such practices and policies to market dynamism. The course leaders use examples from theory and everyday practice to lead the discussion on those questions.

The participants are required to prepare a presentation of their PhD research e. Structured peer- review sessions will be incorporated in the program and participants will provide other PhD students with feedback on their research.

The Summer School offers lectures with discussions, assignments and workshops, all presented and supervised by renowned scholars from various disciplines including sociology, social policy, economics, organisation studies, HRM and labour law. The social legitimacy of many welfare states is challenged by economic and social processes that imply pressures to retrench, re-design, and in some areas, to newly develop welfare provisions. In all cases, redistributive questions will be central as to who should be entitled to what kind of provisions and under what conditions.

Escape to Europe: The migrants' story - BBC Newsnight

Policy-makers of the new welfare setups will have to reckon with the social legitimacy of their proposals and decisions, since work, care and welfare related attitudes form a socio-political context with a conditioning effect on social policy making, either by ex-ante agenda-setting or by ex-post legitimation. How the public feels about redistributive questions may thus importantly affect the future of welfare.

This winter school seeks to address theoretical, empirical and methodological ideas, insights and challenges relating to research on work, care and welfare attitudes. It invites Ph. This winter school will allow a maximum of 25 PhD and post-doctoral researchers to present their work to colleagues and experienced researchers.

In addition, there will be presentations by experienced researchers on their latest work in the field. As a part of the winter school, there will be an introduction and plenary lectures on selected issues of welfare and work related attitudes delivered by the senior researchers. Some of the lectures will deal with substantive issues, while others will focus on methodological and analytical aspects of cross-national and longitudinal analysis of work, care and welfare opinions.


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This is followed by a first reaction from the author s and than by group discussion where senior researchers act as co-commentator and moderator. All papers will be electronically pre-circulated to all participants, at least 3 weeks in advance of the winter school. This pays for organizational costs and facilities, a welcome reception, and a farewell diner. They will have to arrange their own hotel a list of hotels to choose from will be made available in due course , and pay their travel and additional meals.

Reconciling Work, Welfare and Mobility

Direct connections with Brussels train stations are manifold. Participants will be selected on the basis of the quality of their plans for their papers and the fit to the winter school theme. Send your application to: edacwinterschool gmail. Successful applicants will be notified by 1 October second round by 8 October.

The final paper will have to be submitted by 10 January as word or PDF-file.

Flanders: the Heart of Europe

The future of European societies will strongly depend on the realisation of dynamic and inclusive labour markets, with access of all to decent and productive jobs, avoiding segmentation and dualisation. At the same time, collective arrangements for social security, pensions, and welfare are necessary vehicles for social participation and cohesion.

At societal level, the challenge is to overcome the inherent tension and possible zero sum game between on the one hand the increasing flexibility, dynamism and efficiency orientation of present day labour markets, and on the other hand the pressing need for social protection and social order. At the level of the labour market the challenge is to deal with possible tensions between various groups: insiders versus outsiders, old versus new generations, higher and lower educated, and domestic workers versus migrant workers.

Moreover, current labour markets still display a gender bias with respect to terms of employment and employment opportunities. At all levels, the balance between flexibility and security, between modern labour markets and welfare arrangements, is among the most pressing challenges for the EU and its member states. We invite PhD students with projects that deal with issues on or related to the Summer School theme to apply for participation. We value a multi-disciplinary setting and welcome students from a range of academic disciplines, like sociology, economy, law, political science and European social policy.

National, as well as cross-national projects are welcomed, theoretical as well as empirical projects, and projects may be based on quantitative or qualitative methodologies. The Summer School offers lectures with discussions, assignments and workshops, all presented and supervised by renowned scholars from various disciplines such as sociology, social policy, economics, organisation studies, HRM and labour law.

In addition, participating students will have the opportunity to present their PhD-projects and to discuss them in small groups with other participants and scholars. PhD students thus get individual feedback to their projects.

The maximum number of participants is Contact person: Ms. For readers who take an interest in migration and identity debates, David Goodhart's The British Dream is fascinating and important.

Bringing welfare and immigration policy together

It's fascinating because in debates and newspaper articles Goodhart, who until recently edited Prospect and is now Director of the think tank Demos, often appears to brief against his own book 1 , which is a more nuanced and balanced exploration of immigration and its consequences than one might expect.

It's important because Goodhart sets out arguments that deserve debate and poses questions that challenge entrenched views. The book is in essence an articulation of what a sensible centre-right position might look like. It takes a broadly centrist argument for limited immigration, embedded national citizen preference, and strong integration impulses, and marries it to a reduction in the power of individual rights and a plea for stronger national identities that celebrate a robust historical British identity.

The book is enjoyable, reasonably fair-handed, and will open up ideas and debates to a wider, politically engaged audience. Overall, though, it may work better as a series of essays on a theme rather than the evidence-based tract it sometimes wants to be.